0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Original Investigation |

Public Awareness of Head and Neck Cancers:  A Cross-Sectional Survey

Alexander L. Luryi, BS1; Wendell G. Yarbrough, MD, MMHC1,2; Linda M. Niccolai, PhD3; Steven Roser, DMD, MD4; Susan G. Reed, DDS, MPH, DrPH5; Cherie-Ann O. Nathan, MD6; Michael G. Moore, MD7; Terry Day, MD8; Benjamin L. Judson, MD1,2
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
2Yale Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
3Department of Epidemiology, Program of Microbial Diseases, Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
4Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
5Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine, Charleston
6Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport
7Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis
8Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine, Charleston
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014;140(7):639-646. doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2014.867.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Importance  Head and neck cancer (HNC) is responsible for substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost in the United States. Early detection and lifestyle risk factors associated with HNC, both determinants of disease burden and outcomes, are interrelated with public knowledge of this disease. Understanding of current public knowledge of HNC is lacking.

Objective  To assess awareness and knowledge of HNC among US adults.

Design, Setting, and Participants  Online survey of 2126 randomly selected adults in the United States conducted in 2013.

Interventions  Online survey administration.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Subjective and objective assessment of knowledge of HNC including symptoms, risk factors, and association with the human papillomavirus.

Results  Self-reported respondent knowledge of HNC was low, with 66.0% reporting that they were “not very” or “not at all” knowledgeable. This did not vary significantly with tobacco use (P = .92), education (P = .053), sex (P = .07), or race (P = .02). Regarding sites comprising HNC, 22.1% of respondents correctly identified throat cancer, 15.3% mouth cancer, and 2.0% cancer of the larynx, with 21.0% incorrectly identifying brain cancer as HNC. Regarding symptoms, 14.9% of respondents identified “red or white sores that do not heal,” 5.2% “sore throat,” 1.3% “swelling or lump in the throat,” and 0.5% “bleeding in the mouth or throat.” Smoking and chewing or spitting tobacco were identified by 54.5% and 32.7% of respondents as risk factors for mouth and throat cancer, respectively. Only 0.8% of respondents identified human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a risk factor for mouth and throat cancer, but specific questioning revealed that 12.8% were aware of the association between HPV infection and throat cancer whereas 70.0% of respondents were aware of the vaccine targeting HPV.

Conclusions and Relevance  Self-reported and objective measures indicate that few American adults know much about HNC including risk factors such as tobacco use and HPV infection and common symptoms. Strategies to improve public awareness and knowledge of signs, symptoms, and risk factors may decrease the disease burden of HNC and are important topics for future research.

Figures in this Article

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.
Respondent Knowledge of Cancers Included in Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer

Responses to the question “What cancers do you think are included in oral, head, and neck cancer?”

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.
Respondent Knowledge of Symptoms Associated With Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer

Responses to the question “What do you think are the signs and symptoms of oral, head, and neck cancer?”

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Immature Teratoma of the Maxillary Sinus: A Rare Pediatric Tumor. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg Published online Aug 21, 2014.;
Jobs
JAMAevidence.com

Care at the Close of Life EDUCATION GUIDES
Palliative Care for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

brightcove.createExperiences();