0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Original Investigation |

Association of Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants With Changes in Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults

Janet S. Choi, MPH1; Joshua Betz, MS2; Lingsheng Li, MHS3; Caitlin R. Blake, MSPH2; Yoon K. Sung, MHS4; Kevin J. Contrera, MPH1; Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD2,5,6
[+] Author Affiliations
1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
2Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
3University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City
4Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
5Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
6Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2016;142(7):652-657. doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2016.0700.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Importance  Hearing loss is a common health problem in older adults that is strongly associated with the development of depression. Previous cross-sectional studies have reported lower odds of depression among individuals who use hearing aids. However, there have been limited prospective studies investigating the effect of hearing loss treatments on depressive symptoms.

Objective  To investigate the association between treatment with a hearing aid or cochlear implant with depressive symptoms in older adults.

Design, Setting, and Participants  A prospective observational study was conducted of 113 participants 50 years or older who received hearing aids (n = 63) or cochlear implants (n = 50). Participants were recruited from August 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014, at a tertiary care academic center.

Intervention  Hearing aid or cochlear implantation.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Depressive symptoms were evaluated by the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after intervention. The score ranges from 0 to 15, and various scores between 3 and 10 have been used as being suggestive of depression.

Results  The median age of the 113 study participants was 69.6 years (interquartile range, 63.5-77.4 years). At baseline, the mean GDS score for the participants was 41% lower (95% CI, 7%-63%) among those receiving hearing aids (mean score, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.7-3.3) compared with those receiving cochlear implants (mean score, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.1). Cochlear implant recipients’ GDS scores improved from baseline to 6 months after treatment by 31% (95% CI, 10%-47%) and from baseline to 12 months after treatment by 38% (95% CI, 18%-54%). Hearing aid recipients’ GDS scores improved by 28% (95% CI, 0%-48%) at 6 months after treatment but were not significantly different from baseline at 12 months after treatment (16%; 95% CI, –24% to 43%).

Conclusions and Relevance  There was a significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 6 months after treatment for patients receiving cochlear implants and hearing aids; this improvement persisted to 12 months for those who received cochlear implants. Further research is warranted to assess the long-term effect of hearing rehabilitation on mental health in older adults.

Figures in this Article

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.
Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) Scores at 12 Months vs Baseline With Loess Fit

The black line is a reference line representing no change in depressive symptoms at 12 months of follow-up vs baseline. The shaded areas represent 95% CI bands.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.
Change in Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) Scores From Baseline to 12 Months by Baseline GDS Score With Loess Fit

The black line is a reference line representing no change in depressive symptoms at 12 months of follow-up vs baseline. The shaded areas represent 95% CI bands.

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

687 Views
0 Citations
×

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();