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Clinical Note |

Eosinophilic Granuloma Manifesting as Painless Cervical Lymphadenopathy in a Patient Positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1

Peggy S. Myung, MD, PhD; Mondira Kundu, MD, PhD; Soo Kim Abboud, MD
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008;134(2):203-205. doi:10.1001/archoto.2007.14.
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Eosinophilic granuloma is rarely reported within lymph nodes. Furthermore, it is even more rarely reported in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. No definitive etiologic association exists between Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and HIV. However, their potential relationship underscores the significance of cytokines and their influence on biological niches required for Langerhans development and homeostasis.

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Figures

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Figure 1.

Contrast medium–enhanced computed tomographic scan of the neck demonstrating an enlarged left cervical lymph node (arrow) that was excised in the operating room.

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Figure 2.

Hematoxylin-eosin histological stain (×80) of lymph node biopsy (A) showing Langerhans cells and eosinophils; note the characteristic clefted nuclei of the Langerhans cells. Immunostaining of Langerhans cells from the lymph node biopsy demonstrate their expression of markers CD68 (B) and S100 protein (C).

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